My MCAT Score is __. Is that Good Enough to Get Me In?

It’s all relative, as they say. Your MCAT score is “high” or “low” depending on how it compares with the average admissions scores of schools you’re planning on applying to. For a very well-spent $40, you can find out the 10th and 90th percentile scores for all schools (and a whole lot of other great factoids about them), in the Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR) 2011-2012.

As a (very) general rule,  assuming the rest of the application is up to par, 27 is probably a minimum, and 29 will be good enough to get you into most lower-tier schools. If you hit the 30-32 range with a GPA of 3.5 or higher, you’re going to be competitive at most middle-tier schools. When you exceed 34-35, you’re going to be competitive anywhere. Whether or not you’re applying as an in-state resident will also have an effect (in your favor, if you’re in-state).

Of course, major deficiencies in other sections of your application (especially your GPA) will jeopardize your chances of being admitted, no matter what your MCAT score is.


Bryce Johnson co-founded premedFAQ.com in 2011 and is the author of Must Reads for the Well-Rounded Pre-Med on Amazon. If you'd like to write for the site or contribute in another way, feel free to reach out to him on LinkedIn or via email.